Other People’s Houses (Review)

by Abbi Waxman

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The author of The Garden of Small Beginnings returns with a hilarious and poignant new novel about four families, their neighborhood carpool, and the affair that changes everything.

At any given moment in other people’s houses, you can find…repressed hopes and dreams…moments of unexpected joy…someone making love on the floor to a man who is most definitely not her husband…

*record scratch*

As the longtime local carpool mom, Frances Bloom is sometimes an unwilling witness to her neighbors’ private lives. She knows her cousin is hiding her desire for another baby from her spouse, Bill Horton’s wife is mysteriously missing, and now this…

After the shock of seeing Anne Porter in all her extramarital glory, Frances vows to stay in her own lane. But that’s a notion easier said than done when Anne’s husband throws her out a couple of days later. Continue reading “Other People’s Houses (Review)”

The Girl They Left Behind (Review)

by Roxanne Veletzos

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A sweeping family saga and love story that offers a vivid and unique portrayal of life in war-torn 1941 Bucharest and life behind the Iron Curtain during the Soviet Union occupation—perfect for fans of Lilac Girls and Sarah’s Key.

On a freezing night in January 1941, a little Jewish girl is found on the steps of an apartment building in Bucharest. With Romania recently allied with the Nazis, the Jewish population is in grave danger, undergoing increasingly violent persecution. The girl is placed in an orphanage and eventually adopted by a wealthy childless couple who name her Natalia. As she assimilates into her new life, she all but forgets the parents who were forced to leave her behind. They are even further from her mind when Romania falls under Soviet occupation.

Yet, as Natalia comes of age in a bleak and hopeless world, traces of her identity pierce the surface of her everyday life, leading gradually to a discovery that will change her destiny. Continue reading “The Girl They Left Behind (Review)”

Finding True North (Review)

by Audrey Wick

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Life in a small town has always suited Paige Fredrick. She loves going to work near the courthouse square and riding her bike nearly anywhere she chooses. But after her divorce, she can hear her neighbors’ whispers and the gossip mill churning.

Everett Mullins has worries of his own as he finds himself back in his hometown, providing temporary care to his ailing mother while trying to run their family farm. A chance meeting reunites him with Paige, his crush from high school. But when he discovers her little white lie, he questions what they’ve started building.

As Paige makes a new life, can she find direction with Everett? Or has too much damage already been done to navigate a romantic relationship built on a lie?

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In Finding True North, debut author Audrey Wick delivers an engaging story about losses, fears, and second chances. Continue reading “Finding True North (Review)”

Everything We Give (Review)

by Kerry Lonsdale

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From the author of Everything We Keep comes the final novel in the Amazon Charts and Wall Street Journal bestselling Everything Series. Brimming with suspense, mystery, and romance, Everything We Give brings to a powerful close the gripping series of love, lies, and the secrets families keep.

Award-winning photographer Ian Collins made only one mistake in life, but it cost his mother her freedom and destroyed their family, leaving Ian to practically raise himself. For years he’s been estranged from his father, and his mother has lived off the grid. For just as long, he has searched for her.

Now, Ian seemingly has it all—national recognition for his photographs; his loving wife, Aimee; and their adoring daughter, Caty. Only two things elude him: a feature in National Geographic and finding his mother. When the prized magazine offers him his dream project on the same day that Aimee’s ex-fiancé, James, returns bearing a message for Ian but putting a strain on his marriage, Ian must make a choice: chase after a coveted assignment or reconnect with a mysterious woman who might hold the key to putting his past to rest. But the stakes are high, because Ian could lose the one thing he holds most dear: his family. Continue reading “Everything We Give (Review)”

Somebody’s Daughter (Review)

by Rochelle B. Weinstein

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From USA Today bestselling author Rochelle B. Weinstein comes an emotional novel for mothers, daughters, and anyone who has ever felt imperfect.

Emma and Bobby Ross enjoy a charmed life on the shores of Miami Beach. They are a model family with a successful business, an uncomplicated marriage, and two blessedly typical twin daughters, Zoe and Lily. They are established members of a tight-knit community.

Then, on the night of the girls’ fifteenth birthday party, they learn of Zoe’s heartbreaking mistake—a private and humiliating indiscretion that goes viral and thrusts her and her family into the center of a shocking public scandal.

As the family’s core is shattered by disgrace, judgment, and retribution, the fallout takes its toll. But for Emma, the shame runs deeper. Her daughter’s reckless behavior has stirred memories of her own secrets that could break a marriage and family forever.

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Actual and gripping, Somebody’s Daughter is the story of a family dealing with the consequences of a mistake and tell us about the power and the risks of the internet if manipulated with bad intentions. Nowadays, in the social media era, teenagers are the most vulnerable targets of this virtual world. Being part of a kind of “sharing circle”, sometimes they don’t think about the people on the other side of the screen: they might be family, friends, followers, but also people looking for someone’s weakness to manipulate.

Continue reading “Somebody’s Daughter (Review)”

Slightly South Of Simple: A Novel (Review)

The Peachtree Bluff Series – Book 1

by Kristy Woodson Harvey

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From the next “major voice in Southern fiction” (New York Times bestselling author Elin Hilderbrand) comes the first in an all-new series chronicling the journeys of three sisters and their mother—and a secret from their past that has the potential to tear them apart and reshape their very definition of what it means to be a family.

Caroline Murphy swore she’d never set foot back in the small Southern town of Peachtree Bluff; she was a New York girl born and bred and the worst day of her life was when, in the wake of her father’s death, her mother selfishly forced her to move—during her senior year of high school, no less—back to that hick-infested rat trap where she’d spent her childhood summers. But now that her marriage to a New York high society heir has fallen apart in a very public, very embarrassing fashion, a pregnant Caroline decides to escape the gossipmongers with her nine-year-old daughter and head home to her mother, Ansley.

Ansley has always put her three daughters first, especially when she found out that her late husband, despite what he had always promised, left her with next to nothing. Now the proud owner of a charming waterfront design business and finally standing on her own two feet, Ansley welcomes Caroline and her brood back with open arms. But when her second daughter Sloane, whose military husband is overseas, and youngest daughter and successful actress Emerson join the fray, Ansley begins to feel like the piece of herself she had finally found might be slipping from her grasp. Even more discomfiting, when someone from her past reappears in Ansley’s life, the secret she’s harbored from her daughters their entire lives might finally be forced into the open.

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Slightly South of Simple is an emotional and brilliant novel which kept me completely spellbound.

From the beginning, I was really drawn into the story, and the characters and their strong bond are described amazingly by the author.

The storyline alternates Ansley and Caroline’s points of view and follows both the present time and memories of the past in which the reader will find out secrets and strong emotions that will help to better define the strengths and flaws of the characters. Continue reading “Slightly South Of Simple: A Novel (Review)”